Why a robot that can ‘solve’ Rubik’s Cube one-handed has the AI community at war

OpenAI, a non-profit co-founded by Elon Musk, recently unveiled its newest trick: A robot hand that can ‘solve’ Rubik’s Cube. Whether this is a feat of science or mere prestidigitation is a matter of some debate in the AI community right now. In case you missed it, OpenAI posted an article on its blog last week titled “Solving Rubik’s Cube With a Robot Hand.” Based on this title, you’d be forgiven if you thought the research discussed in said article was about solving Rubik’s Cube with a robot hand. It is not. Don’t get me wrong, OpenAI created a software…
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Study suggests ‘gaming disorder’ isn’t actually a thing

A new study suggests that “gaming disorder” — recently added to the International Classification of Diseases — may not be a real thing. At the very least, the researchers think there’s “no evidence” to suggest that the games themselves are the problem. The study comes from the Oxford Internet Institute, and was conducted last year on a group of 1,004 14- and 15-year-olds from around the UK. The kids and their caregivers answered questionnaires about their (the kids’) gaming habits and how the kids functioned in daily life. Dr. Andrew Przybylski, co-auther of the study and director of research at the…
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Evolution tells us we might be the only intelligent life in the universe

Are we alone in the universe? It comes down to whether intelligence is a probable outcome of natural selection or an improbable fluke. By definition, probable events occur frequently, improbable events occur rarely – or once. Our evolutionary history shows that many key adaptations – not just intelligence, but complex animals, complex cells, photosynthesis, and life itself – were unique, one-off events, and therefore highly improbable. Our evolution may have been like winning the lottery…only far less likely. The universe is astonishingly vast. The Milky Way has more than 100 billion stars, and there are over a trillion galaxies in…
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Instagram will remove filters promoting cosmetic surgery amid mental health concerns

If your Instagram feed is anything like mine, it’s littered with timelapses of injected lip fillers, Kardashian-promoted beauty products, and Story filters that “enhance” your face. The subliminal pressure to be “perfect” is no longer subliminal, and it’s putting more more of a strain on young users more than ever. This is why Instagram is planning to remove all AR filters that depict or are associated with cosmetic surgery. Over the past few months, filters like “Plastica” — an effect that gives you extreme plastic surgery — have become increasingly popular, even viral. But with their rapid popularity comes growing…
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Trump’s ignorance couldn’t kill Bitcoin in Q3 — here’s what happened

Bitcoin, undoubtedly the world’s most famous cryptocurrency, has continuously made headlines throughout the year. Despite noticeable fluctuations in price, the cryptocurrency maintained relative health, with its market capitalization vastly surpassing $148 billion at the writing of writing. We’ve taken a closer look at the digital currency‘s performance, focusing specifically on its price movements during Q3 2019. But, first, let’s briefly recap Bitcoin‘s performance during the first six months of the year. Q1 recap Although notorious for its volatility, Bitcoin was relatively stable during Q1 2019. It started the year at $3,717 and a brief 9 percent increase in its trading…
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Supply chains show their weaknesses following Avast and NordVPN attacks

Antivirus solution provider Avast and VPN service NordVPN both disclosed data breaches caused by exposed credentials that granted attackers remote access to internal systems. The twin developments come as supply chain attacks — compromising a third-party vendor with a connection to the true target — targeting security-related apps are becoming a common vector to install malware. A cyber-espionage attempt Czech Republic-based cybersecurity firm Avast said it encountered an “cyber-espionage attempt” on September 23 to insert malware into its popular CCleaner cleanup utility — similar to the supply chain attack of 2017 where the software was infected with Floxif malware. The attackers — dubbed…
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CHEAP: Dive deep with GoPro Hero 7 black waterproof for just $343

Welcome to CHEAP, our series about things that are good, but most of all, cheap. CHEAP! If you travel a lot, you know how fun it is to capture photos and videos of places that you go to and things that you do. But, you need to remember your phone’s battery is precious. Plus, you can’t always take your phone underwater to shoot some cool footage. That’s where the GoPro HERO 7 Black comes in. The waterproof action camera’s base bundle is selling for just $343, down from $565. Here’s what you get in the bundle: GoPro HERO7 Black Rechargeable battery The…
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This marketing hall of famer, Seth Godin, is sharing his freelancing secrets for only $19

Across 12 lectures and an hour of supplemental content, Godin charts the course for you to take more effective control of your career, from sharpening your work techniques and crafting a brand to cultivating clients and boosting demand for your products and services.

NATO’s going to call space a war zone, but don’t worry there won’t be any fighting

At an upcoming summit in early December, NATO is expected to declare space as a “warfighting domain,” partly in response to new developments in technology.If it does declare space a war zone, NATO could start using space weapons that can destroy satellites or incoming enemy missiles. But what is this technology and how could it enable a war? In a recent first for space technology, Russia has launched a commercial satellite specifically designed to rendezvous with other satellites. The purpose of this vehicle is peaceful: it will perform maintenance tasks on other satellites in orbit. The fact that commercial companies…
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It doesn’t matter ‘who’ hacked your business

China. North Korea. Russia. Iran. Why does it matter to your security posture if any of these countries are behind the latest cybersecurity attack? In most cases, it doesn’t, and as a business leader, it probably shouldn’t matter to you. News attaching specific criminal groups to cyberattacks – and perhaps human nature – are driving a need for attribution and understandably prompting organizational leaders to believe it matters who conducted the attack. Attributing WannaCry ransomware to North Korea or NotPetya to Russia is certainly important to law enforcement, but is best left to intelligence agencies. For business leaders, attribution can…
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