Artificial Intelligence

Why using AI to screen job applicants is almost always a bunch of crap

Millions of potential employees are subjected to artificial intelligence screenings during the hiring process every month. While some systems make it easier to weed out candidates who lack necessary educational or work qualifications, many AI hiring solutions are nothing more than snake oil. Thousands of companies around the world rely on outside businesses to provide so-called intelligent hiring solutions. These AI-powered packages are advertised as a way to narrow job applicants down to a ‘cream of the crop’ for humans to consider. On the surface, this seems like a good idea. Anyone who’s ever been responsible for the hiring at… This story continues at The Next Web

Google’s new AI language model can comprehend entire books

One of the prime challenges of a language-based AI model is to understand the context of the surrounding content. To solve this problem, Google has introduced a new model called Reformer, which understands the context of 1 million lines using just 16GB space. The company built this to solve problems of its old model Transformer — a neural network that compares words in a paragraph to each other to understand the relationship between them. Current models, support understanding of a few lines or paragraphs before and after the text in focus. However, as it uses pair matching, Transformer takes a… This story continues at The Next Web Or just read more coverage about: Google

Shanghai is testing facial recognition at pharmacies to catch drug abusers

Every few days, China finds a new way to introduce facial recognition in people’s daily lives. According to a report from the South China Morning Post, Shanghai is testing face recognition terminals at pharmacies to catch folks attempting to buy controlled substances in substantial quantities, likely for resale. The report noted buyers of drugs containing sedatives and psychotropic substances will have to verify themselves through the terminal. The system will scan both pharmacists and buyers to prevent any misdoings. The move is also to prevent people from obtaining medicines that contain raw materials for illegal drugs. For instance, ephedrine or pseudoephedrine, found in drugs… This story continues at The Next Web

AlphaZero beat humans at Chess and StarCraft, now it’s working with quantum computers

A team of researchers from Aarhus University in Denmark let DeepMind‘s AlphaZero algorithm loose on a few quantum computing optimization problems and, much to everyone’s surprise, the AI was able to solve the problems without any outside expert knowledge. Not bad for a machine learning paradigm designed to win at games like Chess and StarCraft. You’ve probably heard of DeepMind and its AI systems. The UK-based Google sister-company is responsible for both AlphaZero and AlphaGo, the systems that beat the world’s most skilled humans at the games of Chess and Go. In essence, what both systems do is try to… This story continues at The Next Web

Apple reportedly acquires Xnor.ai to boost on-device AI

Did you know that, according to CEO Tim Cook, Apple acquires a company every two to three weeks? It’s just added another startup to its long line of AI acquisitions. According to a report by GeekWire, the Cupertino-based company has made a deal with Xnor.ai, an edge-based AI startup, for $200 million. What is edge-based AI, you may ask? It’s a type of AI that executes algorithms locally (meaning on the hardware it’s being used for), instead of relying on the cloud. Xnor.ai specializes in image recognition software that can even run on low-powered devices. We know that iPhones aren’t low-powered… This story continues at The Next Web Or just read more coverage about: Apple

Apple reportedly acquires Xnor.ai to boost on-device AI

Did you know that, according to CEO Tim Cook, Apple acquires a company every two to three weeks? It’s just added another startup to its long line of AI acquisitions. According to a report by GeekWire, the Cupertino-based company has made a deal with Xnor.ai, an edge-based AI startup, for $200 million. What is edge-based AI, you may ask? It’s a type of AI that executes algorithms locally (meaning on the hardware it’s being used for), instead of relying on the cloud. Xnor.ai specializes in image recognition software that can even run on low-powered devices. We know that iPhones aren’t low-powered… This story continues at The Next Web Or just read more coverage about: Apple

Scientists used stem cells to create a new life-form: Organic robots

Straight out of the 1990s and the plot of Jurassic Park, a team of scientists have successfully created an entirely new life-form using stem cells derived from frog embryos. The new species is called a xenobot and it’s unlike anything else in nature. The researchers call it a “living robot” because, though it’s made entirely of organic material, it’s not so much grown as “developed.” Joshua Bongard, a researcher from University of Vermont who co-led the research, said: These are novel living machines. They’re neither a traditional robot nor a known species of animal. It’s a new class of artifact:… This story continues at The Next Web

Elon Musk says Tesla’s early access group will get Full Self Driving ‘soon’

Elon Musk is tweeting about Full Self Driving again. Soon — Buff Mage (@elonmusk) January 11, 2020 Full Self Driving is an upcoming Tesla feature that currently exists in an unfinished form. According to Musk, the feature will eventually make it possible for a Tesla vehicle to drive itself from an owner’s driveway in the suburbs, onto the highway at high speeds, into the city where there’s traffic, weather, pedestrians, and who-knows-what-else, and into your office parking lot. Musk also claimed that by the end of 2020 Tesla would have fully-autonomous robotaxis operating unrestricted on city streets – which, if… This story continues at The Next Web Or just read more coverage about: Tesla

Trump’s chief technology officer is treating AI regulation like the net neutrality repeal

Did you ever notice how the Trump administration’s chief science and technology officer Michael Kratsios never talks while FCC Chairman Ajit Pai is drinking water? I bring this up because there’s a greater chance than zero that they’re the same awful human being. We all know that Pai sold out 80% of US citizens when he chose to ignore the will of the people and repeal the government’s net neutrality guidelines. And now, with Kratsios, we’re seeing the same playbook brought out again for the same reason: money. Only this time, there’s more at stake. Kratsios is proposing we take… This story continues at The Next Web

The benefits of facial recognition AI are being wildly overstated

Facial recognition technology has run amok across the globe. In the US it continues to perpetuate at an alarming rate despite bipartisan push-back from politicians and several geographical bans. Even China’s government has begun to question whether there’s enough benefit to the use of ubiquitous surveillance tech to justify the utter destruction of public privacy. The truth of the matter is that facial recognition technology serves only two legitimate purposes: access control and surveillance. And, far too often, the people developing the technology aren’t the ones who ultimately determine how it’s used. Most decent, law-abiding citizens don’t mind being filmed… This story continues at The Next Web